Saturday, February 05, 2011

Classic Ad of the Month

Sphere: Related Content

Super Bowl Ad Preview - Part 5

from Amy:

Kia takes viewers on an "Epic Ride." The pen is mightier than the sword. Let's launch!


1Doritos' "Crash The Super Bowl" contest has been so successful that Pepsi Max joined the fray. Just like the Pepsi Max contest, discussed yesterday, Doritos also has five user-created ad finalists. Three will make it to the big game.

It's going to be a tough choice. "Adam and Eve" takes us back to biblical times. There's a slight difference in this version: Eve is unable to tempt Adam with a piece of forbidden fruit, for he's fairly content with his bag of Doritos. Watch it here.

"Best Part" is both creepy and funny, so it has a legitimate shot at running during the big game. An office worker finishes his lunch bag of Doritos, when his co-worker remarks that he left the "best part." Yes, we're talking the cheese-stained fingers, and, yes, the creepy co-worker sucked his colleague's finger. See it here.

A father hijacks his son's "Birthday Wish" and uses it to make his fantasies come true. Birthday presents are bags of Doritos, and he gets a robot best friend and a stripper pole erected in the living room for his wife. I love how the son refers to it as a "fireman's pole." How sweet. Watch it here.

Doritos hold magical powers for a man that's "House Sitting" for his friend. The careless house sitter neglected to feed the fish, plants or clean the apartment. Sprinkling the dead fish and plant with Doritos resurrects them both. You'll never guess what happens when Grandpa's ashes are knocked over. See it here.

A man mocks his girlfriend's adorable pug in "Pug Attack." He waves Doritos at the pup through a glass door that's no match for a hungry pug. Watch it here. My favorites are "Birthday Wish," "House Sitting" and "Pug Attack." How about you?

2Own a Kia Optima and be prepared to take an "Epic Ride." The vehicle is not your average mid-size sedan: what other car can make Poseidon emerge from the sea or aliens let their presence be known? The desire for Optima begins with a routine traffic stop. The cop becomes so enamored that he handcuffs the Optima owners to his police motorcycle and takes off. The car is captured by a villain in a helicopter, who directs the Optima toward a luxury yacht. That's when Poseidon emerges, and briefly takes the Optima. Aliens then beam the car into a spaceship, transporting it to their planet. The fun's over when the car goes through a black hole and lands beside a Mayan temple. See it here. David&Goliath created the ad and Initiative handled the media buy.

3The Federal Voting Assistance Program is running a Super Bowl spot that will run on the American Forces Network. The ad will be shown on U.S. Military bases worldwide. This ad is the type of content shown overseas: not Audi, Budweiser or typical Super Bowl ad fare. The ad begins with an inside look at a weapon, as a voiceover details the relationship between a weapon and its owner. "My weapon is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I much master my life." The weapon isn't a gun; it's a pen. "Your vote is your greatest weapon," concludes the ad, created by Mullen. Watch it here.

4Goodby, Silverstein & Partners created a batch of ads for Chevy, running throughout the big game. A honk from a man's Chevy Silverado lets him know when his son "Tommy" is in trouble. Who needs Lassie? In the ad, Tommy falls down a well, gets stuck in a cave, gets loose in a runaway hot air balloon and winds up inside the belly of a whale. See it here.

An ad for Chevy Volt chronicles important historical findings and events. In "Discovery," Ben Franklin's discovery of electricity, a family watching TV for the first time and Woodstock are compared to a power cord that charges a Chevy Volt. Watch it here.

Facebook makes an impromptu appearance in "Status," promoting the Chevy Cruze. A couple part ways following a first-date kiss. The man hops into his Cruze, and activates OnStar to check his Facebook news feed, where his date posts a complimentary status about their evening. See it here. Chevy Cruze eco is highlighted in "Misunderstanding," where a group of seniors misinterpret an ad describing Cruze's 42 miles per gallon. Watch it here.


Amy Corr is managing editor, online newsletters for MediaPost. She can be reached at amyc@mediapost.com.

Sphere: Related Content

12+1 Tips, Day 5

Continuing through February 12th, I'm sharing with you one tip per day from a recent email I received from Jim Meisenheimer.

What's the +1?

His 13th Tip is for a program he offers, and I'm including a link to it everyday.

I have purchased Jim's materials in the past and refer to them regularly.
Here's Jim:

How To Become A
Better Sales Person



How would you like to become a better salesperson?

It's too bad the world is crowded with average and mediocre salespeople.

These average and mediocre salespeople have one thing in common. They don't change. They don't ever change.

It's like, if they've been in sales for 10 years, they have one year of experience and repeated it nine times.

There is a better way you know. All it requires is energy and effort.

5. Read Frank Bettger's book "How I Raised Myself From Failure To Success In Selling." I Crown this book "A selling classic." The kind of book you can read every year, I know, because I do.

It's loaded with ideas that can transform you and the way you sell.


And here's the +1:

Become a Sales Trailblazer. In the first seven days of 2011, 8 professional salespeople signed up for my Sales Trailblazer Sales Training Program.

So what's the big deal? The big deal is they have committed to a 24 week training program.

The big deal is they'll bring more to the table than a salesperson who has decided not to participate in the acquisition of new selling skills.

You can be average and mediocre or be a Sales Trailblazer and become a better salesperson.

And remember, your future is determined by the choices you make today.

Jim Meisenheimer
13506 Blythefield Terrace
Lakewood Ranch, FL 34202
Tel: 800-266-1268
Fax: 941-907-0441
jim@meisenheimer.com
www.startsellingmore.com

Sphere: Related Content

Friday, February 04, 2011

Friday Night #Marketing News from Mediapost

Click & Read:


Food
by Karlene Lukovitz
"As part of our strategy to step up our investment in our power brands, we're looking for new ways to engage with our consumers and really change the conversation," says Kraft's Dana Anderson. "What better venue to do this than the Super Bowl? During the pre-game, we have a unique opportunity to connect with people as they're preparing their menus for the big game." ...Read the whole story >>
Retail
by Sarah Mahoney
The ForeSee Results study found that more traditional marketing techniques not only generated more traffic, they also deliver better-quality customers. "Some of the most satisfied site visitors arrived at the site because of previous familiarity with a brand, promotional emails, word-of-mouth, and product review websites," it says in its report. ...Read the whole story >>
Automotive
by Karl Greenberg
There will be a record number of carmakers -- around 10 if you include pre- and post-game affairs -- and a lot of them are extending their ads way off the gridiron with social media, teaser ads, and games this week and last designed to generate buzz and involve consumers in the buildup to "Super Ad Buy XLV." ...Read the whole story >>
Retail
by Sarah Mahoney
"It's been volatile and uneven since last summer or so, and we expect it to continue to be so for the rest of this year," Frank Badillo, Kantar's senior economist, tells Marketing Daily. "But spending intentions among consumers are bouncing back. That's fed by a number of things -- there is more certainty, post-election. The stock markets are recovering. And there have been some great price promotions from retailers, starting before the holiday." ...Read the whole story >>
Telecom
by Tanya Irwin
"One of our goals is to create ways for people to experience FiOS services live, whether it's in a store, at an event, at one of our mall kiosks, or -- as in the case of our Game Day promotion -- at a customer's home," Foster tells Marketing Daily. ...Read the whole story >>
Sports
by Karl Greenberg
The campaign, developed by the NHL in consultation with global advertising agency Young & Rubicam, features a 30-second ad that has a camera panning across a frozen Canadian lake, where one sees evidence that hockey games were once played. The camera pans past footprints in the snow, skate marks, and a goalie stick. ...Read the whole story >>
Telecom
by Aaron Baar
"This is the network," the television commercial begins, "a living, breathing intelligence that's helping business rethink how to do business." Visuals show packages being moved from Tokyo to New York while the voiceover speaks of inventory being "taught to learn" so that it can get products to where they're needed most. ...Read the whole story >>

Sphere: Related Content

Get Specific

from Drew:

Using personas to shift your focus to the customer

Posted: 31 Jan 2011 07:00 AM PST

106498980 If you look at most marketing copy -- it's about the "thing" -- whatever is being sold. We get features and generic benefits but our focus and the thrust of the message sits squarely on the shoulders of the product or service.

And it's no wonder. When you focus on something, you tend to write/talk about it.

Let's demonstrate.

If I asked you to write a headline for an ad selling these red shoes to the right -- what would your headline say?

(Seriously, take a couple minutes and jot a few down...play along!)

Okay, for many of you your headlines probably ran along the lines of:

  • Isn't it time to get sassy?
  • Give your feet some sassy for Valentine's Day
  • Stop traffic without lifting a finger

Nothing wrong with those...but they are a bit generic. They be be speaking to anyone of any age, income bracket, marital status, etc.

Why? Because we don't actually know who we're talking to...other than we probably assumed it was a woman, so the copy tends to be generic. The more generic your audience (in your mind) the more generic the copy. Which forces us to focus on the "thing."

Which is why personas are so critical to your marketing success. Do you know who your business is talking to? And don't say everyone. Every business should know who their best customers are. These are the people who create the core of your customer base. Creating personas based on this customer base is critical to targeting your message. I wrote about personas and shared some examples a few years back. (click on the link to read).

Let's try the shoe example again but now I'm going to tell you about the customer. Her name is Leslie and she's 15. She's in that awkward half girl/half woman stage and she wants to grow up so badly. She's a good kid, active in school and loves to hang at the mall with her friends. She spends much of her free time texting, reading fashion magazines and watching MTV's reality shows.

I could add (and should if this was a real persona) much more depth but you get the idea. Now try your headline again.

Mine might be: Your dad is going to hate these shoes

Very specific and very much about my audience -- rather than about the product. That's what personas do. They shift our focus to the prospect rather us talking about ourselves. You can't create a love affair with a generic customer. Getting to know your personas and really seeing them as a living, breathing person

Using personas is a very helpful trick for writing stronger copy, creating content that gets shared, developing customer service programs, making your website sticky and driving sales. If you haven't developed 3-4 personas for your brand -- put it on your to do list for Q1 of 2011. It will make the rest of the Q's

P.S. If you want more info on personas, Marketing Profs is doing a webinar on February 10th specifically about the topic.

Sphere: Related Content

Super Bowl Ad Preview - Part 4

Amy's Updates continue, and I'll have one more on Saturday:

Hyundai hypnotizes. Viewers create and select Pepsi Max Super Bowl ads. Let's launch!


Hyundai will run three ads during the big game, marking the automaker's fourth consecutive year as a Super Bowl advertiser. Two ads promote the 2011 Elantra and one promotes the Sonata Hybrid vehicle. The first Elantra ad, "Hypnotized," will run during the first quarter. It showcases average driving imagery, like the sound of your turn signal, the clanging of your keychain while driving, windshield wipers in use, and how hypnotic and rhythmic these actions can be. Interspersed with the pictures is the phrase: "Have we been hypnotized to believe compact cars are good enough?" Cue imagery of an elegant Elantra and Jeff Bridges' soothing voiceover. See it here.

Next up is "Deprogramming," running in the third quarter. Jeff Bridges hopes to place viewers under his spell as his voice lulls you into a trance-like state, coupled with kaleidoscopic images of compact cars, legs, gas tanks and driving sheep, a nod to an ad the brand launched during the AFC championship game,. "Compact cars don't have to be boring or feel compact," says Bridges as he brings viewers back to reality, stating," Snap out of it, man." Watch it here.

1"Anachronistic City" runs in the fourth quarter and it's quite funny. Throngs of early, first-generation devices are shown: silent movies, hefty mobile phones, fat-burning techniques, televisions and cameras. Had we settled for every first-generation device that came along, the 2011 Sonata Hybrid wouldn't be here. It's not the first hybrid car by any means, but it's sleek, updated and well-equipped. It's my favorite of the trio and it does a great job at conveying its overall brand message: First doesn't always mean best. Watch the ad here. Innocean Worldwide created the campaign.

Pepsi Max is participating in the "Crash The Super Bowl" contest for the first time. We'll talk about the Doritos user-created ads tomorrow. Five Pepsi Max ads are finalists, but only three will run as Super Bowl ads. The two ads with the most votes are guaranteed to run, leaving Pepsi Max execs to choose the third spot. There's big money to be made for any ad placing in the top three of USA TODAY's Ad Meter: anywhere from $400,000 to $1 million.

The ads are good. Let's begin with "Elevator Girl." I laughed out loud at this one. A guy has a crush on a woman who lives in his building. He's not too smooth, however, but his chance with her gets better when she eyes his case of Pepsi Max. He offers her a soda, and then explains that it contains zero calories. "What are you trying to say?" she asks. "No, no, no, you're not fat," he replies. Watch it here. I hope this makes the cut.

"First Date" is the weakest of the five ads, but I can see it garnering a big game spot. Viewers hear the inner thoughts of a couple on their first date. The woman wonders if the man wants kids, if he's "the one," and how much he makes. The man's thoughts are simple: he wants to sleep with her. His thoughts change once her Pepsi Max is delivered to the table. He wants it. Her thoughts tell the man he has no chance. See it here.

2A husband receives tough love from his wife in "Love Hurts." He will be punished for eating junk food and fast food, but that doesn't compare to what happens when he checks out another woman... in front of his wife. Watch it here.

A nerdy guy exacts revenge on his tormentor, thanks to a Pepsi Max "Torpedo Cooler." See it here.

"Zero Calories?" is clearly an homage to Budweiser's "Whazzup" guys; the only difference here is the drink of choice is Pepsi Max and women are saying "pshhh." Watch it here. I'm rooting for "Elevator Girl," "Love Hurts" and "Zero Calories." What are your picks?


Amy Corr is managing editor, online newsletters for MediaPost. She can be reached at amyc@mediapost.com.

Sphere: Related Content

12+1 Tips, Day 4


Continuing through February 12th, I'm sharing with you one tip per day from a recent email I received from Jim Meisenheimer.

What's the +1?

His 13th Tip is for a program he offers, and I'm including a link to it everyday.

I have purchased Jim's materials in the past and refer to them regularly.
Here's Jim:

How To Become A
Better Sales Person



How would you like to become a better salesperson?

It's too bad the world is crowded with average and mediocre salespeople.

These average and mediocre salespeople have one thing in common. They don't change. They don't ever change.

It's like, if they've been in sales for 10 years, they have one year of experience and repeated it nine times.

There is a better way you know. All it requires is energy and effort.


4. Read the Wall Street Journal everyday. Now, you don't have to read the entire Wall Street Journal everyday, but you should be looking for new ideas you can use to grow your business.

Reading this newspaper will also enable you to become quite the conversationalist, which is a good thing to be if you're in sales.


And here's the +1:

Become a Sales Trailblazer. In the first seven days of 2011, 8 professional salespeople signed up for my Sales Trailblazer Sales Training Program.

So what's the big deal? The big deal is they have committed to a 24 week training program.

The big deal is they'll bring more to the table than a salesperson who has decided not to participate in the acquisition of new selling skills.

You can be average and mediocre or be a Sales Trailblazer and become a better salesperson.

And remember, your future is determined by the choices you make today.

Jim Meisenheimer
13506 Blythefield Terrace
Lakewood Ranch, FL 34202
Tel: 800-266-1268
Fax: 941-907-0441
jim@meisenheimer.com
www.startsellingmore.com

Sphere: Related Content

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Thursday Night Marketing News from Mediapost

Click and read:


Automotive
by Karl Greenberg
Now Nissan is extending the riff with a new interactive comic book-style movie on its YouTube channel that lets people decide where the film's narrative leads. The effort, "Choose Your Adventure," has Kowalczyk again heading to the donut shop, except the viewer can choose where he goes and what choices he makes at different points in the story. ...Read the whole story >>
Financial Services
by Tanya Irwin
Information about the site will appear in lifestyle magazines such as More, O and Better Homes & Gardens. Ads will also appear on O's new iPad app. The strategy is to partner with strong brands that women already look to for advice and guidance in many areas of their life, including finances, according to a spokesman. ...Read the whole story >>
Trends
by Karlene Lukovitz
Given female consumers' more positive overall attitude and focus on self-empowerment, physical and emotional health and making "real changes" in their lives, "marketers should reexamine the ways that they are talking to and engaging with women," stresses Saatchi & Saatchi Wellness chief strategy officer Johanna Skilling. ...Read the whole story >>
Retail
by Karl Greenberg
"Hispanics over-index for do-it-yourself and, perhaps more importantly for NAPA, they over-index in the automotive service technical professions," says PM Publicidad's Eduardo Perez. "Hispanics represent 12% of the working population in the U.S., but at least 17% of mechanics are Hispanic." ...Read the whole story >>
Retail
by Sarah Mahoney
The moves are part of sweeping changes at Gap Inc.'s floundering flagship, which the company hopes will "kick-start" a new marketing direction. It ditched Marka Hansen, who has been president of Gap North America, naming Art Peck, a six-year company veteran, to fill the post. ...Read the whole story >>
Sports
by Sarah Mahoney
Adbowl -- launched by McKee Wallwork Cleveland, a little Albuquerque-based ad agency, back in 2001 -- tracks what consumers think of the ads during the game, and has expanded its reach to include iPhone voting this year. (You can log on to its site, use the iPhone app, or the social media stream to follow results throughout the game.) ...Read the whole story >>

Sphere: Related Content

Another Reason Not to Ignore....


Those of us who were born before 1965.

We are the Boomers.

And we are helping our parents, Aunts & Uncles decide on how to spend their nest eggs and live comfortably.

More from Mediapost:


The Largest Target Market You've Never Thought About: How Brands Can Connect With Caregivers

There are 43 million Americans who care for elderly loved ones, according to a recent study from the National Alliance for Caregiving, AARP, and MetLife. These family caregivers, many of whom are "sandwich generation" moms busy juggling their own working and family lives, are responsible for making decisions about products and services for elderly family members. Compare this with 2 million brides and 4 million new mothers, and you can see that caregivers are a huge, and growing, market.

Research across the Caring.com community found that 80% of family caregivers discuss treatment options with their loved ones' doctors, while 79% order or pick up prescriptions and 75% purchase personal care or grocery items for their loved ones. Furthermore, 71% of caregivers manage finances for their ailing relatives. This is a "twofer" audience, since these women are also consumers of products and services for their own care. As a brand marketer, how do you connect with this massive, influential, and unique audience?

The prototypical family caregiver, according to Caring.com research, is a "Boomer" woman in her 50s who's caring for her parents. She juggles a job and the needs of her own family, often putting kids through college. She's under a lot of pressure and, according to 59% of respondents in a recent Caring.com survey, her caregiving commitments constitute the greatest stress in her life.

Before creating a campaign targeted to the caregiver demographic, brands first need to understand this group on an individual level. Caregivers may not self-identify, but they're highly connected to a larger community of other people in the same position, often using social networks to share insights, stories, and concerns with one another. Caregivers want to connect with others, and they want compassion and understanding; your first step in creating campaigns that will resonate with this demographic is to try to understand their day-to-day experience.

It's important to tailor your marketing messages, product information, and promotional offers to caregivers' unique role as decision makers and purchasers for others. Here are four tips advertisers can use to ensure that their campaigns targeting caregivers hit the mark:

  • Associate your brand with a connection place. Caregivers appreciate connecting with one another for support and advice, so your brand should create, sponsor, or advertise on an online community or caregiver-focused website, where caregivers share and exchange insights.
  • Simplify your message. Caregivers' time is limited, so they'll be more likely to respond to concise messages that clearly communicate your offer or service. That said, it's okay to use "storytelling" in your campaigns, as caregivers appreciate hearing about the real-life experiences of other people in their shoes. One in-home care company changed the creative in a banner ad from a bulleted list of the service's benefits to the story of a visit to a grandmother's house -- and conversion increased by 400%.
  • Empower the caregiver. Boomers are natural authority questioners, and they take their role as advocates for their loved ones' medical or financial issues seriously. Your campaigns targeting caregivers should provide information and invite interaction. Allow caregivers to ask questions about your products or services online. If you want to impact the buying habits of caregivers, treat them as your brand advocates, engaging them with your message on a personal level and making it easy to share.
  • Choose function over fashion. Leave the flashy content, such as video, HTML 5, and flash, to your other campaigns. Caregivers want clear information to make critical purchase decisions; they aren't looking to be entertained by your ads. If you do use rich media, make it functional -- for example, provide online checklists, buying guides, or other interactive tools caregivers can use to narrow down the product field based on the unique needs of their loved ones. And don't forget about the simple things such as making offers and info sheets printable and portable so caregivers take your messages and share them with loved ones.

The 43 million Americans who care for elderly loved ones are making important purchase decisions every day. Is your brand reaching this massive purchasing force with relevant messages, promotions, and product positioning? If not, you're leaving millions in potential revenue on the table -- and missing out on connecting not just with the current caregiver demographic but with a massive generation of future older people -- the Boomers -- who themselves will need your products one day soon.


Andy Cohen is an experienced caregiver and CEO of Caring.com. Andy's 20-year career in marketing includes leadership positions at SC Johnson Wax, Peapod, and Intuit.

Sphere: Related Content

Super Bowl Ad Preview - Part 3

from Amy:

Rejoice: a Dot-commer creates a Super Bowl ad that's halfway decent. Let's launch!


1I was all for this ad until the baby hit the window. Homeaway.com, a vacation rental Web site, is launching "Smush" in the third quarter of the big game. Music that sounds as if it was ripped from a James Bond film plays while the "Ministry of Detourism" takes viewers on a tour of a secret lair that saves family vacations from disastrous events. Like ricocheting your baby into a window. The secret test facility demonstrates what can go wrong when staying in hotels: having loud neighbors and rooming in cramped quarters are top vacation downers. On the other hand, renting a house gives families privacy and space. And keeps your babies on terra firma. "Why hotel when you can Homeaway," closes the ad, seen here. Vendor Inc. created the ad, directed by Rocky Morton of MJZ, with visual effects by The Mill.

2Teleflora, the online flower store that delivers flowers in vases rather than cardboard boxes, gets a most-improved ad award from me. After two years, the brand has ditched the talking flowers that belittled and insulted recipients. Sorry, Don Rickles: not even your voiceover could save those ads. This year, the 30-second spot, running in the second quarter, stars Faith Hill, promoting "The Collection by Faith Hill" floral arrangements. The spot takes place in a recording studio, where Hill helps her sound tech say the perfect thing to his girlfriend on Valentine's Day. I can't post the ad until post-Super Bowl, but I can tell you the funny moment targets the male population. Fire Station created the ad, produced by Hungry Man and directed by Bryan Buckley.

3Stella Artois is trickling out information about its big game commercial. "Crying Jean" stars Adrien Brody as a singer in an underground jazz club circa 1960. The ad is the latest in the brand's "She is a Thing of Beauty" campaign. Naturally, Brody sings to a group of beautiful women, but only has eyes for Stella. More on this ad when further information is released. In the meantime, viewers can go online for a behind-the-scenes look at the making of "Crying Jean." Mother London created the ad.

2Volkswagen update: Wow. Judging by the number of emails I received yesterday, everyone is itching to watch "The Force." I didn't have a postable ad yesterday, but I do today. So without further ado, here are the full-length Volkswagen Super Bowl ads, entitled "The Force" and "Black Beetle." Enjoy.

4Bridgestone update: There may be an ice storm hitting the East Coast, but that didn't stop my delivery of Super Bowl ads. You read that right: my DVD came today and made my morning. The bad news is that I can't post the ads until after the big game. But I will tell you this. If you reread my potential ad outcomes from Monday, they're not far off from the actual endings. I'm talking 80% accurate. Brush up so you'll be a step ahead of your Super Bowl party friends.


Amy Corr is managing editor, online newsletters for MediaPost. She can be reached at amyc@mediapost.com.

Sphere: Related Content

12+1 Tips, Day 3


Continuing through February 12th, I'm sharing with you one tip per day from a recent email I received from Jim Meisenheimer.

What's the +1?

His 13th Tip is for a program he offers, and I'm including a link to it everyday.

I have purchased Jim's materials in the past and refer to them regularly.
Here's Jim:

How To Become A
Better Sales Person



How would you like to become a better salesperson?

It's too bad the world is crowded with average and mediocre salespeople.

These average and mediocre salespeople have one thing in common. They don't change. They don't ever change.

It's like, if they've been in sales for 10 years, they have one year of experience and repeated it nine times.

There is a better way you know. All it requires is energy and effort.


3. Write and send five handwritten notes every selling day. If you can't show your gratitude to five different people everyday, it could mean you're not working hard enough.

Gratitude is a gift that keeps on giving. Show your gratitude on a daily basis and people will begin to appreciate you so much more.


And here's the +1:

Become a Sales Trailblazer. In the first seven days of 2011, 8 professional salespeople signed up for my Sales Trailblazer Sales Training Program.

So what's the big deal? The big deal is they have committed to a 24 week training program.

The big deal is they'll bring more to the table than a salesperson who has decided not to participate in the acquisition of new selling skills.

You can be average and mediocre or be a Sales Trailblazer and become a better salesperson.

And remember, your future is determined by the choices you make today.

Jim Meisenheimer
13506 Blythefield Terrace
Lakewood Ranch, FL 34202
Tel: 800-266-1268
Fax: 941-907-0441
jim@meisenheimer.com
www.startsellingmore.com

Sphere: Related Content

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

Wednesday Night #Marketing News from Mediapost

Click & Read:

Automotive
by Karl Greenberg
The effort, via AOR TBWA Chiat/Day, centers on a 30-second television spot showing what minivans are actually for: carrying kids and a lot of stuff. The campaign also includes digital advertising, print, and social. The Franklin, Tenn.-based company is also partnering with a new Disney animated film, "Mars Needs Moms," which premieres in early March. ...Read the whole story >>
Technology
by Aaron Baar
"They've positioned it as in the middle between the choice and variation of Android phones and the user experience of an iPhone," says NPD Group's Ross Rubin. "Microsoft [also] has some catching up to do with the App market. But unlike its competitors, it has experience managing developer communities." ...Read the whole story >>
Retail
by Karl Greenberg
Says Mike Kelly, EVP of marketing for PVH: "What we are doing as a corporation is moving spend from pure fashion to the sports space because we are finding an emotional connection there. What we are learning is that what's fun about sports is that you are going into a space where people are passionate and they talk." ...Read the whole story >>
Retail
by Sarah Mahoney
By channel, online sales had the best year, up 22%. Sales of toys at food and drug stores advanced 6%, and at toy stores, 4%. Department stores were far less popular for toy shoppers, with sales sinking 11%, while toy sales at mass merchants and discounters, such as Target and Walmart, slipped 2%. ...Read the whole story >>
Hospitality
by Tanya Irwin
The 2011 spot stars the fictional "Minister of Detourism" in a top-secret government testing facility where he highlights the pitfalls of cramped hotel rooms and showcases the benefits of vacation rentals: Privacy, space and freedom. A family is seen in a "hotel room simulator," where they suffer from "limited space syndrome" and struggle to get comfortable in the cramped quarters. ...Read the whole story >>

Sphere: Related Content

Selling Ice to Eskimos

As I wrote this introduction last night, the wind was howling as sleet and snow was coming down for the Blizzard of 2011.

Ever hear the expression, "Selling Ice to Eskimos"? Yesterday I tried selling unassembled snowmen on Craigslist.

Read this from Seth Godin:

When was the last time you bought a tie?

My guess is not lately.

When you first got a fancy job, you had a tie shortage, and thus attention was paid to ties. You bought "enough for now." Then you solved the tie problem and moved on.

When you first bought an iPhone, you had an app shortage, so attention was paid to apps. You bought "enough for now." Then you moved on.

Music might be an exception (buying a new stereo doesn't often lead to a new music binge). But in general, some external event occurs that creates a fissure, an opportunity, a problem. We search, we buy, we're done.

The challenge, then, is to develop products that match what the market is looking for, and more important, to overtly and aggressively seek out the people in that situation and ignore the rest. Which is precisely what most marketers large and small are not doing right now.

RELATED: Many marketers I know have a great idea for a product or service that will target a segment of the market that doesn't know to look for the great idea. For example, you might want to sell a better, easier to use hatchet for women. The problem is that women, long accustomed to never being able to find an axe that they're comfortable with, have given up looking, perhaps several generations ago.

Alerting a market segment that isn't looking is a thousand times harder than activating a segment that just can't wait for your arrival. Since it's your choice, since the segment is up to you, why not pick one that is itching for you to show up?

Sphere: Related Content

Super Bowl Ad Preview - Part 2

from Amy at Mediapost:

What kind of Super Bowl would it be without animals? Let's launch!


1The chimps are back, following a five-year hiatus. Careerbuilder is bringing chimpanzees back during the third quarter of the game. The animals work for Yeknom Industries (monkey spelled backwards), alongside one human employee. He gets the brunt of the abuse, naturally. In "Parking Lot," our human employee is the middle layer of a car sandwich. A chimp parks over the line, making it impossible for the human to open his driver-side door. The human decides to exit through the passenger-side door, when "Ron" slams into his car, sandwiching him inside. "Stuck between a bad job and a hard place," asks a voiceover. "Careerbuilder.com. Start building." Watch the ad here, created in-house.

2Volkswagen is running two Super Bowl spots in the second quarter and fourth quarter, promoting the Beetle and Passat. A teaser ad for "Black Beetle" stars an actual black beetle zooming through a mossy forest. See it here. And that's pretty much all that happens in the full 30-seond spot. The beetle is on a mission and nothing will stand in his way -- not centipedes, fire ants or praying mantis. When the beetle jumps from a log onto a rock, his profile becomes the automobile's profile. "The 21st century Beetle. Coming this fall," closes the spot. I enjoyed "The Force" more. A child dressed as Darth Vader roams his house, looking for ways to use The Force. He can't will the washing machine on, move a doll from a bed or force his adorable dog off his doggie bed. Feeling down, he tries one last time to use The Force on Dad's Passat. Lo and behold, the car turns on -- much to the shock of mini Darth Vader, but of no surprise to Dad, who used his remote keypad from inside the kitchen. Deutsch LA created the ads.

3How do you follow up a Super Bowl ad that essentially revived the career of Betty White? All eyes are on you, Snickers. The brand is continuing with its "You're Not You When You're Hungry" campaign with a Super Bowl ad running in the third quarter. "Logging" stars Richard Lewis and Roseanne Barr as chainsaw-wielding loggers who are cranky, hungry and did I mention chainsaw-wielding? I expect it will be funny, but I can't imagine it besting Betty White. I can see it besting Liza Minelli and Aretha Franklin, though. See the teaser ad here, created by BBDO New York.

Audi update: Remember that Audi Super Bowl ad I wrote about yesterday? Well, this morning, the snow gods aligned and I previewed the entire 60-second spot. Bad news is, I can't post it or tell you who makes an amusing final scene cameo. The person is totally unexpected until halfway through the ad, when an obvious hint is dropped -- but it's not until the very last scene that said person materializes. I think you'll like it.


Amy Corr is managing editor, online newsletters for MediaPost. She can be reached at amyc@mediapost.com.

Sphere: Related Content

12+1 Tips, Day 2


Continuing through February 12th, I'm sharing with you one tip per day from a recent email I received from Jim Meisenheimer.

What's the +1?

His 13th Tip is for a program he offers, and I'm including a link to it everyday.

I have purchased Jim's materials in the past and refer to them regularly.
Here's Jim:

How To Become A
Better Sales Person



How would you like to become a better salesperson?

It's too bad the world is crowded with average and mediocre salespeople.

These average and mediocre salespeople have one thing in common. They don't change. They don't ever change.

It's like, if they've been in sales for 10 years, they have one year of experience and repeated it nine times.

There is a better way you know. All it requires is energy and effort.


2. Do something that very few entrepreneurs and professional salespeople do. Calculate what your sales quota equals on a daily basis. Then divided it by two. Now you know how much you need to sell every morning and every afternoon.

Look, it's your time and it's extremely important that you value it properly. This will help you do that.


And here's the +1:

Become a Sales Trailblazer. In the first seven days of 2011, 8 professional salespeople signed up for my Sales Trailblazer Sales Training Program.

So what's the big deal? The big deal is they have committed to a 24 week training program.

The big deal is they'll bring more to the table than a salesperson who has decided not to participate in the acquisition of new selling skills.

You can be average and mediocre or be a Sales Trailblazer and become a better salesperson.

And remember, your future is determined by the choices you make today.

Jim Meisenheimer
13506 Blythefield Terrace
Lakewood Ranch, FL 34202
Tel: 800-266-1268
Fax: 941-907-0441
jim@meisenheimer.com
www.startsellingmore.com

Sphere: Related Content

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Tuesday Night Marketing News from Mediapost

Click & Read:


Automotive
by Karl Greenberg
Chevrolet may have been licking its wounds last year, but it's back big-time now and out to prove the point at the Super Bowl next Sunday. The automaker will have six or more TV spots in the game, plus a post-game surprise -- which GM Global CMO Joel Ewanick and Chris Perry, VP of U.S. marketing, are keeping mum about for now. ...Read the whole story >>
Retail
by Sarah Mahoney
Consumers see Greek yogurt as healthier, more convenient and better tasting: "Remarkably, apart from a relatively small subset of total category buzz related to deals and coupons, most of the conversation deals not with price but instead with the benefits of Greek yogurt." ...Read the whole story >>
Food
by Karlene Lukovitz
"We're kind of debunking the notion that only children want great-tasting cereal," says Derek Sherman, executive creative director for Kellogg's long-time creative agency, Leo Burnett. "This is definitely an adult, non-decadent breakfast cereal, but our message is that it's a joyful experience. We looked for a humorous way of conveying this to an adult audience that also fits with Kellogg's well-established positive, optimistic brand voice." ...Read the whole story >>
Research
by Aaron Baar
Moreover, a full three-quarters of those marketers said they'll increase their spending (by an average of 59%) in the coming year. Of the 97 qualified respondents surveyed, 62% said they had already used some form of mobile marketing, while another 26% said they planned to begin doing so this year. ...Read the whole story >>
Financial Services
by Tanya Irwin
"We think that banks that dominate the next 10 years will empower customers and be perceived as authentic financial partners," Change Sciences Partner Steve Ellis tells Marketing Daily. "The problem is that authenticity is hard. Consumers have been burned, and they know it. Recognizing that there is a problem is the first step." ...Read the whole story >>
Tourism
by Karl Greenberg
"With Love, Philadelphia XOXO" includes a consumer-engagement program to get people to come up with text for billboard advertising. The campaign launches this week with dominations in New York City and Washington, D.C., train stations, and with advertising on the CNN Airport Network. ...Read the whole story >>

Sphere: Related Content