Thursday, January 14, 2010

New Ad Campaigns

I've seen 2 of these, how about you?

From Amy:

Fans make the music. Snowfall alerts. Threesomes. Let's launch!

The Recording Academy unveiled a great ad campaign for the 52nd Annual GRAMMY Awards, airing Jan. 31 on CBS. "We're All Fans" features fans' postings from YouTube, Twitter, Flickr and Facebook that pay homage to favorite musicians. Traditional components drive traffic to a Web site that's updated in real time with postings on GRAMMY-nominated artists. One TV ad is a collage of LL Cool J fans uploading videos of themselves lip-synching lyrics to "Rock the Bells," and tweets from fans and the rapper himself. Watch it here. I expected the song used throughout Lady Gaga's TV spot to be "Paparazzi," since it contains lyrics such as "I'm your biggest fan." But I was wrong. "Poker Face" is used instead. I like the ad's ending with fans belting out song lyrics. See it here. Print and outdoor ads create a collage of tweets and YouTube videos of the five artists nominated for Album Of The Year -- Beyoncé, the Black Eyed Peas, Lady Gaga, Dave Matthews Band, and Taylor Swift. See the ads here, here, here, here and here, created by TBWA/Chiat/Day Los Angeles.

Three's not a crowd in a TV spot for Dolce & Gabbana's D&G Time -- but four, on the other hand... A young woman leads her paramour through a dimly lit hallway, stopping to kiss in front of a mirror. The viewer sees the reflection of a second man watching the two lovers. Tensions seem to fade fast as the lucky lady receives affection from both men on a nearby sofa. Everything is going smoothly until the woman's mother walks in and lets out a loud scream that is stifled by a hand wearing a stylish D&G watch. Watch the ad here. Cyril Guyot directed the ad, edited by Company X.

A teenage girl's father lets loose while on a Carnival Cruise Lines vacation. He wears shorts, goes offline for days and bursts her bubble, literally. The daughter comes across her father dancing wildly and the bubble she is blowing explodes. "Fun for all. All for fun," closes the ad, shown here. Arnold created the ad and MPG handled the media buy.

Interstate Batteries launched a TV spot illustrating the importance of a dependable car battery. "Pinball" begins with two friends watching a car slide down an icy road. A light bulb goes off in one friend's head: his car is parked at the bottom of the icy hill. Will the out-of-control car stop in time? Rather than wait and see, our friend bolts out of his apartment, runs down the icy hill and makes it to his car in plenty of time. Too bad his car won't start. "Shoulda had an Interstate," says the man from the runaway car. See the ad here, created by Firehouse.

Mammoth Mountain, a winter resort in California, is running a series of digital billboards in Los Angeles through Feb. 14 called "Mammoth Dump Alerts." Each ad links to a weather widget on, which reports new snowfall amounts within the last 24 hours. The real-time technology is programmed to show snowfalls of 12" or more. For those who love cold weather and skiing, this is a great billboard. Especially when you imagine the message being delivered in a warm climate. See the ads here and here, created by David&Goliath.

Online investing firm Scottrade launched a pair of TV spots using an updated logo and new tagline, "Get Invested." TV ads star Chad A. Ridgeway, a broker doing a poor job convincing his clients not to use Scottrade. In one ad, Chad is riding in the back of a limo en route to picking up his dry cleaning. I'm surprised he's doing it himself. See it here. Chad makes a call from his office in the next ad, shown here. Sadly, he's more interested in playing with his desk toys than he is with getting his client's name right and convincing them not to flee to Scottrade. The ads will run on USA, Travel, A&E, ESPN, Discovery and the NFL playoffs. Gearon Hoffman created the campaign and media buying was handled in-house.

Seventh Generation launched "Protect Planet Home," a TV, print and online campaign focusing on the brand's role in helping consumers keep their homes devoid of hazardous cleaning products. The spot follows a handful of people who are trashing their household cleaning products and replacing them with Seventh Generation merchandise. Thanks to Seventh Generation, the voiceover says, "the five-second rule is extended" and "no one holds their breath while they're cleaning." I'll probably still stick with the five-second rule, but that's just me. The ad closes with a house in the shape of Planet Earth. See it here. The campaign launched Monday and runs through April on Bravo, Food Network and USA, among others. Carmichael Lynch created the campaign.

"It's not science fiction. It's what we do every day," ends a pair of ads promoting the U.S. Air Force. Technology once thought to be light-years away is used in present-day situations by the U.S. Air Force. In one spot, a group of troops are rescued from a planet resembling Mars after an unmanned aircraft finds enemy snipers awaiting the troops. See it here. Another spot shows pieces of space debris colliding, putting debris in the pathway of a communication satellite. The U.S. Air Force shifts the satellite's position and a potential collision is diverted. Watch the ad here. GSD&M Idea City created the campaign and handled the media buy.

Random iPhone App of the week: Mozes launched a free app enabling fans to browse and participate in more than 15,000 promotions from 5,000 bands, brands, artists, sports teams, organizations and causes. Artists such as Keith Urban, Rascal Flatts, Lil' Wayne and Kelly Clarkson interact directly with fans via Mozes platform. Users can enter sweepstakes to win free tickets to upcoming shows, get exclusive news, updates and wallpapers from bands by joining their mobile fan list.

Amy Corr is managing editor, online newsletters for MediaPost. She can be reached at

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