Thursday, March 17, 2011

New Ad Campaigns

Amy's latest update:

Lip-syncing unicorns, green rivers and unwelcome houseguests. Let's launch!

1 Slow and steady does not win the race when you're a bank robber in need of making a fast "Getwaway." Three criminals learn this lesson the hard way in the latest ad in Starburst's "Contradictions" campaign, promoting Sweet Fiesta flavors. The solid, yet juicy candies are little consolation to the burglars, still donning pantyhose on their heads and unable to shake a policeman... on foot. See the ad here, created by TBWA/Chiat/Day New York.

2Devo's strangely-themed music video "Whip It," complete with cowboys and red cone hats, never made much sense to me in the '80s. Fast-forward to 2011, when Juicy Fruit paired YouTube star Keenan Cahill, with a unicorn puppet to lip-sync the '80s classic. It makes no sense, but I'm rolling with it. This is the first of three music videos launched featuring the return of the "Serenading Unicorn." The other videos debut March 22 and April 5. While you count down the days, post a unicorn serenade on your friend's Facebook wall. Select from themes like "I see you're single again," "I like you more than a friend" and "Let's hang out this weekend." I have to admit, the serenades are pretty funny. Evolution Bureau created the campaign.


The Colorado Lottery launched "Lucky Liam," a 60-second Web film promoting its St. Patrick's-Day -themed Shamrock Shuffle scratch offs. Liam has perfect skin, a horseshoe grill and spouts lines like "I'm straight up rainbow walking your way, shooting stars in the sky when I'm making it rain." Look out for background unicorns in the ad, seen here and created by Cactus, Denver.


McDonald's needs a better lid on its shamrock shake. It keeps conveniently spilling into the Chicago River, dyeing it green, just in time for St. Patrick's Day. Last year, during the annual river dyeing celebration, McDonald's planted a life-sized shake on the side of the river, giving the impression that the shake dyed the river green. This year, the shake has legs... or at least a motor. The 12-foot cup was attached to a boat this year and driven down the river, once again making it appear that it was responsible for the green hue. See pictures here, here and here. Take note of the dirt and grime found at the bottom of the shake and remember: it's probably cleaner than the dye used to make the river green! Leo Burnett created the campaign.

5 Coca-Cola is making an appearance in the bedrooms of teenagers worldwide with "Coca-Cola Music," a program that gives teens an inside track on creating music and the chance to see upcoming artists at work. The band One Night Only wrote and recorded the song "Can You Feel It" for the program. The track serves as the background music to "Walls," a global TV ad targeting teens. The commercial follows teenagers worldwide, partaking in the universal act of coming home from school, grabbing a Coke, going to their bedroom and rocking out to their favorite song. I love the wall of teens singing into their bedroom mirrors, then collapsing onto their beds. See the TV ad here, and the full-length branded music video here. Wieden+Kennedy Amsterdam created the campaign.

6Levolor blinds launched a print campaign in Elle Decor, House Beautiful and Traditional Home magazine this week, hoping that DIYers will look at blinds and think: Hey, they're important room accessories, too. Paint, rugs and furniture are elements DIYers tend to think of first. Creative takes window blinds and shapes them into a paint can, rug and chair. Adjoining copy states: "Paint isn't the only thing that can brighten up a room." See the ads here, here and here, created by Carmichael Lynch.


I, too, would deem this as an "Excellent Day." New Balance launched a TV spot where a track is built from the ground up, mirroring the voiceover's statement that "excellence is built from the ground up." Once the track is in place, flyers are hung throughout New York advertising a race. Professional runners, adults, kids and dogs show up and participate in the event. I was hoping to like this ad more, since I'm a runner, but it didn't really speak to me. Watch the ad here, created by Arnold Worldwide Boston.

8 Terminix wants homeowners to know that small creatures can cause insurmountable damage to a home. Larger-than-life "Flying Monsters" wreak havoc among any homes that stand in their way. Houses are reduced to a crumbled mess once the winged creatures eat through the wood. In reality, the big monsters are small termites, but the damage is equally crippling. "If there were something that devoured 1 in 30 homes, causing up to $8,600 in damage you'd expect it to look like this. Not this" -- referring to tiny termites. See the ad here, created by Publicis Dallas.

Amy Corr is managing editor, online newsletters for MediaPost. She can be reached at

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